SAWT BEIRUT INTERNATIONAL

| 17 June 2021, Thursday | النسخة العربية

Sawt Beirut International’s News Bulletin- May 20, 2021

In today’s news bulletin:

– Through provocations, Syrian refugees have renewed Assad’s term in Lebanon in a black day for democracy.

– Syria’s allies in Lebanon defend provocative convoys and launch threats.

– Families of Beirut port martyrs: the real celebration is when the gallows are hung up.

From Syria to Lebanon, it is a black day for democracy. In broad terms, no one can be against democracy and in particular, no one can be against democracy if it were applied to a regime that does not even recognize democracy, such as al-Assad regime in Syria. But there is a big difference between the real democracy and the one tailored by the Assad regime.

Regardless, we will not talk today about what happened in Syria because it should be addressed separately. On the other hand, we do not understand how Syrian nationals supporting the Syrian regime have converted the election day in Syria into a day during which they challenged and engaged in provocative acts against the Lebanese people.

They actually roamed all Lebanese regions in convoys, brandishing photographs of Bashar al-Assad, in addition to Syrian and Baath Party flags, in a clear and blatant provocation to the people’s feelings. The Lebanese people haven’t yet forgotten what the Assad regime has done to them; such regime destroyed their cities, demolished their houses, murdered their children and stole their wealth. The regime also killed their elite leaders one after another.

It would be enough if we remember what the Syrian regime did in Tripoli and Beirut and who killed Salim Al-Lawzi, Riad Taha, Mufti Hassan Khaled, Sheikh Sobhi Al-Saleh, the two presidents Bachir Gemayel and René Moawad, and countless others.

It would be enough if we remember who provided a cover to the assassination of the leaders of the Cedar Revolution, starting with martyr Rafik Bahaa Al-Hariri.

It would be enough if we remember that hundreds of Lebanese prisoners are still incarcerated in Assad’s jails and that the head of the regime there refuses to even admit that they are caught in the “cells of death and terror”.

Despite all of this, supporters of the Syrian regime were determined to engage in provocations against the Lebanese people across most of the Lebanese territories, turning the twentieth of May in Lebanon into a graveyard for real democracy.

One last advice to supporters of the regime in Lebanon: as long as you support Bashar al-Assad to this extent, and as long as you believe in his democracy and respect for the other opinion, why don’t you return to Syria as shelling has subsided and the situation has calmed down? What’s better than enjoying democracy under Assad’s rule?