SAWT BEIRUT INTERNATIONAL

| 21 June 2021, Monday | النسخة العربية

Sawt Beirut International’s News bulletin – Monday, June 7, 2021

A brief of today’s news bulletin:

  • Electricity is on a declining trajectory… The squandering of billions invariably results in darkness.
  • Capital Control was examined by the Money Committee; would it be subjected to traps of those affected?
  • Consecutive lapses for the Interior Minister overthrows his assignment as a Prime Minister-designate

Darkness spreads in the land of light. The laboratory of Al Sharq Hospital are nearly completely shut down. As a result of power outages and other reasons, hospitals are in jeopardy, and a water crisis looms. Last but not least, financial matters are malfunctioning and deteriorating in the country of banking secrecy and the most successful banking sector in the East. Despite the Finance and Budget Committee’s acceptance of the Capital Control law today, scandals are rife. Do we still live in a legitimate nation, or has the nation vanished and the state crumbled and crashed? Following the facts, it is apparent that Lebanon is witnessing two eras and phases. The first stage is the stage of downfall, which is personified by a dishonest and corrupt system that tries everything it can to preserve its privileges and gains, and sacrifices everything to stay in power and control people’s fates.

Whether the ruling system accepts this or not, Lebanon will come to an end slowly but surely, since it is a country that defies history and stands in opposition to the natural growth of countries and cultures. In light of the governing class’s insolvency, ineptitude, and corruption, the best proof that Lebanon, in its first stage, is no longer sustainable. Is it realistic to expect a country on the edge of collapse to go without a functioning government for ten months? Is anyone concerned that a disagreement over the appointment of two ministers could stymie the reorganization of political power? Is it usual for everything to be permitted notwithstanding a designated prime minister’s refusal to deal with Gebran Bassil in exchange for Bassil’s demand that Saad Hariri negotiates directly with him?

We’ve reached the end of the tunnel, but beyond it, there’s a glimmer of hope: a new Lebanon is on its way, no matter how tyrannical you make it, no matter how egotistical the pompous is, no matter how long the corrupt and thieves delay.