SAWT BEIRUT INTERNATIONAL

| 1 December 2021, Wednesday |

Sawt Beirut International’s News Bulletin – Oct. 21, 2021

A brief of Aoun and Mikati’s meetings: Positive talks, with zero reforms.

Despite all of the pleasant words and good intentions, the governmental-judicial crisis appears to have come to a halt. The reason for this is because the political authority doesn’t assume its responsibility as effectively as it should. The President of the Republic and the Prime Minister are two examples of the political authority. President Michel Aoun is the country’s First Judge, whether he likes it or not, so what did he do to defend the judiciary and judge Tarek Bitar’s position against the political system’s pillars? So yet, nothing has happened.

Judge Bitar, however, is not asking for lovely words from the President of the Republic at the moment, Hezbollah’s first and most important ally in Lebanon. So why does Aoun not put his faith in the party to defend Bitar, but rather to defend the potential of discovering the truth and subsequently bringing Bitar to justice? The more significant question is whether the president’s party, the Free Patriotic Movement, is truly committed to Bitar’s victory.

He is content with words and verbal attitudes that are practically useless. The judicial investigator needs more than beautiful words from the President of the Republic, the first and most important ally of Hezbollah in Lebanon. So why isn’t President Aoun investing some efforts with the party to defend Judge Bitar, the truth, and achieve justice? The more significant question is whether the president’s party, the Free Patriotic Movement, is truly committed to Bitar’s victory. Or does he pursue the policy of gaining Christian “supporters” so that he doesn’t lose the remaining votes in the future parliamentary elections?

Najib Mikati’s condition isn’t any better. He claims that the judicial and political tracks should be separated so that he is not responsible for any daring and courageous decisions. He flees and evades as usual, believing that the best solution for difficult issues is time. Mikati, on the other hand, forgets that the government, not any other authority, is ultimately responsible for the outcome.

Mikati also forgets or ignores the fact that it was he who said at the start of his government’s term that “anyone wants to disrupt government work gets out of the way.” So, what did he do and how did he deal with the impediment? Nothing at all. It’s worth noting that the turmoil threw the country into a financial, economic, and social crises that’s impossible to escape or overcome. In brief, Najib Mikati, just as Michel Aoun delivers lovely words, with a vulnerable performance. Lebanon, may you find peace!