SAWT BEIRUT INTERNATIONAL

| 16 April 2024, Tuesday |

Climate change exacerbates humanitarian crisis in Yemen

International warnings about the detrimental impact of extreme climate events on humanitarian conditions in Yemen persist as the population copes with extensive flood damages and the spread of diseases.

Recently, the UN issued a renewed warning about the imminent return of floods, which are expected to hit several Yemeni provinces this month. These floods are anticipated due to the onset of the rainy season, which typically lasts until late August.

The UN’s Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) has identified the provinces of Dhamar, Ibb, Aden, Lahj, and Taiz as areas likely to experience floods due to the possibility of heavy rainfall.

Approximately 1,500 individuals are expected to be affected by these floods, prompting a call for vigilance and caution.

According to the shelter cluster, which comprises various UN organizations involved in humanitarian relief efforts in Yemen, the number of individuals affected by heavy rains and floods that occurred in Yemen from March to June 24 has risen to over 300,000 people, according to the latest data.

Moreover, more than 44,000 households, totaling 308,000 individuals, in over 100 directorates across 19 Yemeni provinces, have suffered damages.

Hodeidah, located in the western part of Yemen, ranked highest among the most affected provinces by floods, with 27,700 households impacted.

Aden province followed closely in second place, with 12,300 affected households.

In third place was Ibb province, with 1,600 households affected.

Sanaa witnessed damage to 1,500 households, while Saada province suffered damage to 1,200 households.

According to the shelter cluster, the humanitarian response to flood-affected Yemenis reveals significant gaps, ranging from 60% to 96%, with an average of 72%, in meeting the overall needs for non-food items, shelter, and emergency assistance.

These needs are at the forefront of the humanitarian requirements for those affected by the floods.

    Source:
  • Asharq Al-Awsat